Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 1-9
Gender Variation on the Perception of Climate Change Impact on Human Health in Moba Local Government Area of Ekiti State, Nigeria
Biola Badmos, Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Henry Sawyerr, Department of Environmental Health Science, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Gabriel Salako, Department of Environmental Management and Toxicology, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Atinuke Oyewumi, Department of Environmental Health Science, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Adeolu Adedotun, Department of Environmental Health Science, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Oluwasogo Olalubi, Department of Public Health, Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria
Olabisi Badmos, Centre for Development Research, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
Received: Dec. 7, 2017;       Accepted: Dec. 26, 2017;       Published: Feb. 26, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jher.20180401.11      View  1972      Downloads  169
Abstract
This study investigated the influence of gender (sex) on the view of people towards the impact climate change on human health in south-west Nigeria. Data were collected by means of semi-structured questionnaire from impartial sampled males and females in Moba Local Government Area of Ekiti state, Nigeria. Using descriptive statistics and chi-square test, the collected data were analysed for (i) gender variation on the respondent’s perception about climate change, (ii) gender variation in the perception of the respondents as regards the impact of climate change on human health, and (iii) association between sex type and perception on the impact of climate change on human health (malaria, disability, displacement, flooding, and cholera). Males and females showed comparable knowledge about climate change and its impact on human health, but males were slightly knowledgeable. In some aspect, gender showed significant association (p ≤ 0.05) with respondent’s view on the impact of climate change on human health. Females showed better awareness as regards climate change contributing to malaria, while males are better aware as regards climate change contributing to flooding. Important concern revealed in this study is the low public awareness on the indirect health impact of climate change. Hence, continuous enlightenment of people on the various health impacts of the changing climate is recommended.
Keywords
Climate Change, Perception, Health, Gender
To cite this article
Biola Badmos, Henry Sawyerr, Gabriel Salako, Atinuke Oyewumi, Adeolu Adedotun, Oluwasogo Olalubi, Olabisi Badmos, Gender Variation on the Perception of Climate Change Impact on Human Health in Moba Local Government Area of Ekiti State, Nigeria, Journal of Health and Environmental Research. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-9. doi: 10.11648/j.jher.20180401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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