Volume 4, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 35-41
Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Bacteria Isolated from Door Handles of University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria
Augustine Brian Odigie, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria
Frederick Osaro Ekhaise, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria
Paul Ikechukwu Orjiakor, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Eze Chibuzor Nwadibe, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria
Odeyemi Adebowale Toba, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ekiti State, Nigeria
Odoh Chuks Kenneth, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 6, 2018;       Accepted: Feb. 16, 2018;       Published: Mar. 23, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.jher.20180401.15      View  1833      Downloads  158
Abstract
In recent times, surfaces of hospital environment, constantly exposed to activities of patients and health-care workers, have been identified as potential routes for horizontal dissemination of drug resistant microorganisms of public health significance. This study was conducted to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile of bacteria isolated from samples collected from door handles of various units in University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Out of the 66 door handles sampled and analysed bacteriologically, 68 predominant bacteria distributed among five (5) species of Escherichia coli (30.9%), Staphylococcusaureus (26.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17.6%), Streptococcus pneumonia (13.2%) and Bacillus subtilis (11.8%) were isolated. Kirby Bauer techniques of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility test on the isolates using 9 commercial antibiotics according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) procedure showed resistance of P. aeruginosa to five (5) drugs (Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim, Streptomycin, Ampicillin, Cephalexin and Nalidixic acid), E. coli to five (5) drugs (Ofloxacin, Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim, Ampicillin, Cephalexin and Nalidixic acid), S. pneumoniaeto two drugs (Ampicilin and Nalidixic acid) and S aureus to only Nalidixic acid. Agarose gel electrophoresis carried out on their plasmid DNA revealed detectable fragments in P. aeruginosa and E. coli. After plasmid curing, the isolates became sensitive to Streptomycin, Cephalexin,Ofloxacin, Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim, Ampicillin and Ciprofloxacin. Findings from this study suggest the presence of plasmid mediated multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa and E. coli on surfaces of hospital door handles. Hence, public education on proper personal hygiene and disinfection techniques are recommended in hospitals.
Keywords
Antibiotics, Door Handles, Plasmid, Bacteria
To cite this article
Augustine Brian Odigie, Frederick Osaro Ekhaise, Paul Ikechukwu Orjiakor, Eze Chibuzor Nwadibe, Odeyemi Adebowale Toba, Odoh Chuks Kenneth, Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Bacteria Isolated from Door Handles of University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria, Journal of Health and Environmental Research. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 35-41. doi: 10.11648/j.jher.20180401.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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