Volume 5, Issue 4, December 2019, Page: 95-100
Prevalence and Epidemiological Profile of Accidents with Exposure to Blood Among Health Professionals in Two Hospitals in the North of Togo
Wasungu Bassokla Ditorguena, Department of Medicine and Specialties, University of Lome, Lome, Togo; Occupational Health Research and Expertise Unit, Occupational Health Consulting, Lome, Togo
Djalogue Prisca, Department of Medicine and Specialties, University of Kara, Kara, Togo
Agbobli Yawo Apelete, Department of Medicine and Specialties, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Dadjo Soukouna Francis, Department of Medicine and Specialties, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Sidy Dia, Faculty of Medicine and Odonto Stomatology, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal
Mame Coumba Gaye Fall, Faculty of Medicine and Odonto Stomatology, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal
Ekouevi Koumavi Didier, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Lome, Lome, Togo
Wognin Sangah, Training and Research Unit in Medical Sciences, University of Felix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Ndiaye Mor, Faculty of Medicine and Odonto Stomatology, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal
Bonny Jean-Sylvain, Training and Research Unit in Medical Sciences, University of Felix Houphouet Boigny, Abidjan, Ivory Coast
Sow Mamadou Lamine, Faculty of Medicine and Odonto Stomatology, University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal
Received: Jun. 24, 2019;       Accepted: Oct. 14, 2019;       Published: Dec. 5, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.jher.20190504.11      View  105      Downloads  70
Abstract
Accidents with exposure to blood (AEBs) remain a reality in healthcare settings and are, by their frequency, a major concern for health professionals. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of AEBs history, to identify the types, circumstances and mechanisms of occurrence and to describe the practices of health professionals with respect to AEBs. We conducted a descriptive cross-sectional study over a period of two (02) months (September-October 2018) in two hospitals, the Kara’s teaching hospital and Kara’s regional hospital, both located in the north, 418 kilometers from Lomé, economic capital of Togo. The study population was represented by health professionals practicing in the district pediatrics, surgery, gynecology-obstetrics, emergencies and laboratories of the said centers. Were included in the study health professionals presents and available in the above-mentioned services at the time of the survey. Hospital staff not directly involved in patient care (administrative, mortuary staff, vigils, pharmacy salesmen) were excluded from the study. This research was a descriptive-analytical technique using interviews and questionnaires anonymized and adapted in such a way that it meets our objectives. Methods of data analysis were made using the Sphinx V5 software version 5.1.0.2. The Chi-square statistical test was used to compare the proportions with a significance threshold of 5%. The prevalence of AEBs was estimated at 67.6%. The results show that AEBs were frequent among men compared to women (72.7% vs 58.3%), without significant difference. Age, occupational qualification and seniority in the medical profession were significantly associated to AEBs. The most common mechanism of occurrence was the skin break (89.1%). The equipment or sharp objects handled at the time of the accident were a hollow needle (58.8%), and the most incriminated body fluid was blood (71.7%). AEBs are a reality in health care in Togo with a very high prevalence and concern daily all socio-professional categories especially the nurses and the midwives during the care tasks. Exposure is roughly daily, however, the amount of vaccination coverage in these two hospitals is low. In addition, for health care workers to some dangerous actions, such as disposal of used needles, lack of attention to wearing PPE will be accepted in certain circumstances without risk, it is observed.
Keywords
Accident with Exposure to Blood, Prevalence, Healthcare, Togo
To cite this article
Wasungu Bassokla Ditorguena, Djalogue Prisca, Agbobli Yawo Apelete, Dadjo Soukouna Francis, Sidy Dia, Mame Coumba Gaye Fall, Ekouevi Koumavi Didier, Wognin Sangah, Ndiaye Mor, Bonny Jean-Sylvain, Sow Mamadou Lamine, Prevalence and Epidemiological Profile of Accidents with Exposure to Blood Among Health Professionals in Two Hospitals in the North of Togo, Journal of Health and Environmental Research. Special Issue: Lack of Education in the Field of Health and Environment in Undeveloped Countries. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2019, pp. 95-100. doi: 10.11648/j.jher.20190504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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